RSSCommentary

Religious liberty and constructive freedom

Religious liberty and constructive freedom

| Jason Adkins | June 21, 2018 | 0 Comments

Almost 40 years ago, in June 1979, Pope John Paul II traveled to his homeland of Poland, and within nine days ignited a human rights revolution that continues to shape the Church and the world today.

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Sweat and blood in the spiritual life

Sweat and blood in the spiritual life

| Brad Parent | June 21, 2018 | 0 Comments

As a culture, we are fascinated by sports. Hundreds of millions of people tune in to watch the Super Bowl, World Cup, Olympics and other sporting events. Even among those who aren’t athletically inclined, names like LeBron James, Tom Brady and Usain Bolt are as much pop culture icons as they are athletes, and the allure of watching them compete is undeniable.

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Oh, Susanna! The poetry and  pro-life power of baby names

Oh, Susanna! The poetry and pro-life power of baby names

| Christina Capecchi | June 7, 2018 | 0 Comments

The big news from the Social Security Administration is the ousting of a champion: Liam has dethroned Noah as the nation’s most popular boy name. This was the headline of its newly released baby-name report, an annual synthesis of Social Security card applications from the past year that offers a fascinating cultural statement and doubles as a tip sheet for expectant parents.

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How to honor fathers with love

How to honor fathers with love

Beer. Golf. TV. Mowing. Burping. Fishing.
According to greeting cards in the store aisles, this is all that modern fathers care about.

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A better way for women’s health care

A better way for women’s health care

| Dr. Amy Fisher | June 5, 2018 | 0 Comments

In 1960, the first birth control pill was approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Since then, physicians have been using the birth control pill and a multitude of other hormonal methods packaged as injections, implants and intrauterine devices to regulate fertility and suppress women’s menstrual cycles.

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Advocacy: More life-giving than you think

Advocacy: More life-giving than you think

| Rachel Herbeck | May 23, 2018 | 0 Comments

As Catholics, we are called to actively live out the Gospel in public life. It’s a call that sometimes solicits the thought, “Do I really have to?”

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Return to Damascus

Return to Damascus

During the Easter season, we are retold the stories of how the Church grew from a small band of Jewish disciples to a worldwide faith of believers. We recall how the Holy Spirit intervened in the lives of St. Peter and St. Paul to bring about a mission to the gentiles. Yes, it was on the road to Damascus that Saul encountered the risen Jesus, which led to his conversion from a Christian persecutor to an apostle.

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Receive like a man

Receive like a man

| Jonathan Liedl | May 22, 2018 | 0 Comments

A few years ago, I was on a discernment retreat with a religious community in Kansas. I had come to the monastery in something of a vocational vertigo: religious life, marriage and diocesan priesthood all swirled before me as possible options, leaving me disoriented and drained. Self-imposed pressure to “figure out” my calling was weighing me down, preventing me from making any actual progress.

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Cures for ‘chronic news funk’

Cures for ‘chronic news funk’

| Greg Erlandson | May 18, 2018 | 0 Comments

I have been a news junkie almost all my life. I’ve read a daily newspaper since grammar school, progressing from comics to sports to the front page. I was the first one in my family to get up in the morning, so I was the first to fetch the newspaper from the driveway.

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Consenting to Sex

Consenting to Sex

| May 15, 2018 | 0 Comments

Recent news articles exploring the post-#MeToo world of romance have noted the phenomenon of cell phone “consent apps,” allowing millennials to sign digital contracts before they have sex with their peers, sometimes strangers they have just met.

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The politics of language

The politics of language

Those defending the indefensible continue to use vague words, abstraction and misleading terms to impose their will. And it can be alarmingly effective because corrupt language obscures the truth and dulls the intellect. As Orwell himself put it, “every such phrase anaesthetizes a portion of one’s brain.”

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