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“Unorthodox” and the Modern Myth of Origins

“Unorthodox” and the Modern Myth of Origins

| Bishop Robert Barron | May 27, 2020 | 0 Comments

Unorthodox, a mini-series that debuted on Netflix a few weeks ago, is the story of a young woman who escapes from her oppressive Hasidic community in Williamsburg, Brooklyn and finds freedom with a group of welcoming friends in Berlin.

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“Laudato Si” athwart modernity

“Laudato Si” athwart modernity

| Bishop Robert Barron | May 27, 2020 | 0 Comments

In preparation for my participation in a USCCB sponsored symposium for the fifth anniversary of Pope Francis’ encyclical letter Laudato Si, I reread the famous and controversial document with some care. Many of the themes that struck me five years ago stood out again, but on this reading I was particularly impressed by the pope’s sharply critical assessment of modernity.

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Why we can’t do evil even if good may come

Why we can’t do evil even if good may come

| Bishop Robert Barron | May 11, 2020 | 0 Comments

There is a curious and intriguing passage in the third chapter of St. Paul’s letter to the Romans, which in the context of the missive seems almost tossed-off, but which has proven to be a cornerstone of Catholic moral theology for the past two thousand years.

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The Quarantine’s Three Lessons About the Church

The Quarantine’s Three Lessons About the Church

| Bishop Robert Barron | May 5, 2020 | 0 Comments

One silver lining for me during this weird coronavirus shutdown has been the opportunity to return to some writing projects that I had left on the back-burner. One of these is a book on the Nicene Creed, which I had commenced many months ago and on which I was making only very slow progress, given my various pastoral and administrative responsibilities.

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Governor Cuomo and God’s Noncompetitive Transcendence

Governor Cuomo and God’s Noncompetitive Transcendence

| Bishop Robert Barron | April 28, 2020 | 0 Comments

Last week, Andrew Cuomo, the governor of New York, made a rather interesting theological observation. Commenting on the progress that his state has made in fighting the coronavirus, and praising the concrete efforts of medical personnel and ordinary citizens, he said, “The number is down because we brought the number down. God did not do that. Faith did not do that.”

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Tragedy, Contingency, and a Deeper Sense of God

Tragedy, Contingency, and a Deeper Sense of God

| Bishop Robert Barron | April 10, 2020 | 0 Comments

I have lived in Santa Barbara, California for the past four years. In that brief time, my neighbors and I have experienced a number of real tragedies. Just over two years ago, the terrible Thomas Fire broke out in my pastoral region, in the vicinity of Thomas Aquinas College (hence the name). For a frightening month it made its devastating way from Santa Paula through Ventura, Carpenteria, Montecito, and eventually commenced to devour the foliage on the hills just north of my home.

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The coronavirus and sitting quietly in a room alone

The coronavirus and sitting quietly in a room alone

| Bishop Robert Barron | March 18, 2020 | 0 Comments

Blaise Pascal said, “All of humanity’s problems stem from man’s inability to sit quietly in a room alone.” The great seventeenth-century philosopher thought that most of us, most of the time, distract ourselves from what truly matters through a series of divertissements (diversions).

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Violence against Christians and the waning of reason

Violence against Christians and the waning of reason

| Bishop Robert Barron | May 29, 2019 | 0 Comments

There were more Christian martyrs in the twentieth century than in all of the previous nineteen centuries combined. Hitler, Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, and many of their lesser-known totalitarian colleagues put millions of Christians to death for their faith in that terrible hundred-year period.

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The Real Danger Posed by the California Confession Bill

The Real Danger Posed by the California Confession Bill

| Bishop Robert Barron | May 29, 2019 | 0 Comments

SB 360, a piece of proposed legislation currently making its way through the California state senate, should alarm not only every Catholic in the country, but indeed the adepts of any religion.

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Michelle Wolf and the throwaway culture

Michelle Wolf and the throwaway culture

| Bishop Robert Barron | May 2, 2018 | 0 Comments

The other night at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, Michelle Wolf, who I’m told is a comedian, regaled the black-tie and sequin-gowned crowd with her “jokes.” Almost all were in extremely bad taste and/or wildly offensive, but one has become accustomed to that sort of coarseness in the comedy clubs and even on mainstream television. However, she crossed over into the territory of the morally appalling when she indulged in this bit of witticism regarding Vice President Mike Pence: “He thinks abortion is murder, which, first of all, don’t knock it until you’ve tried it. And when you do try it, really knock it, you know. You gotta get that baby out of there.” One is just at a loss for words. I mean, even some in the severely left-leaning crowd in Washington groaned a bit at that remark.

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The Most Unexpectedly Religious Film of the Year

The Most Unexpectedly Religious Film of the Year

| Bishop Robert Barron | April 11, 2018 | 0 Comments

I went to see A Quiet Place, John Krasinski’s new thriller, with absolutely no anticipation of finding theological or spiritual themes. I just wanted a fun evening at the movies. How wonderful when a film surprises you! I don’t know if I can find the golden thread that draws all of these themes together into a coherent message, but I think one would have to be blind not to see a number of religious motifs in this absorbing film.

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A case for priestly celibacy

A case for priestly celibacy

| Bishop Robert Barron | April 5, 2018 | 0 Comments

There is a very bad argument for celibacy which has reared its head throughout the tradition and which is, even today, defended by some. It runs something like this: married life is morally and spiritually suspect; priests, as religious leaders, should be spiritual athletes above reproach; therefore, priests shouldn’t be married.

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