Teach students role of justice in migration, pope says

| Carol Glatz | November 7, 2017 | 1 Comment
Pope speaks on migration

Catholic universities need to study the root causes of forced migration and ways to counter the discrimination and xenophobic reactions it provokes in so many traditionally Christian nations, Pope Francis said.

Catholic universities need to study the root causes of forced migration and ways to counter the discrimination and xenophobic reactions it provokes in so many traditionally Christian nations, Pope Francis said.

“I would also like to invite Catholic universities to teach their students, some of whom will become leaders in politics, business and culture, a careful reading of the phenomenon of migration from the point of view of justice, global co-responsibility and communion in cultural diversity,” he said.

The pope made his remarks during an audience Nov. 4 with members of the International Federation of Catholic Universities, who were attending a world congress in Rome Nov. 1-4 titled, “Refugees and Migrants in a Globalized World: Responsibility and Responses of Universities.”

Pope Francis praised the organization’s efforts in the fields of research, formation and promoting social justice.

He called for more study “on the remote causes of forced migrations with the aim of finding practical solutions” because people have a right to not be forced to leave their homes.

“It is also important to reflect on the basic negative — sometimes even discriminatory and xenophobic — reactions that the welcoming of migrants is provoking in countries with a long-standing Christian tradition” in order to develop programs and ways to better form consciences, he said.

Pope Francis also called on Catholic universities to develop programs that would allow refugees living in camps and holding centers to take distance-learning courses and to grant them scholarships.

Efforts also are needed, he said, to recognize the academic degrees and qualifications migrants and refugees have earned in their homelands so that their new countries may better benefit from their knowledge.

Catholic universities, as leaders in promoting the social good, must do more, he said, for example, by encouraging students to volunteer to assist refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants.

Category: U.S. & World News

  • Charles C.

    There is a limit to what universities can emphasize, they can’t put everything in first place. I can imagine that the schools feel the need to follow the lead of the Holy Father. Given that, what will Catholic schools teach?

    They will teach the dangers of global warming, capitalism, and immigration controls. Students will be taught to avoid decisions or judgment based on a strict following of the Church’s teachings. Schools should also teach students to condemn Trump, conservative Catholics, and gun manufacturers and salesmen. Oh, and they’ll also stick their necks out and say terror attacks and mass killings are bad things. All of the things that any left-wing liberal arts school is already teaching.

    But will they be taught the orthodox Catholic faith? The Venerable Archbishop Fulton Sheen famously said:

    “I tell my relatives and best friends, ‘If you want your children
    to fight for their faith, send them to public school. If you want them
    to lose their faith, send them to Catholic school.’”

    There are about 250 Catholic colleges and universities in the US. The Cardinal Newman Society, “Promoting and defending faithful Catholic education,” recommends 21. The recommendation is earned after the school applies and is examined through on campus reviews, interviews with school officials, faculty, and students, attendance at classes and Masses, and a review of records and questionnaires. (No Minnesota colleges describing themselves as Catholic have been recommended.)

    Perhaps His Holiness is assuming that Catholic schools already present the Catholic faith? In the US at least, that assumption appears to be unwarranted.