Archbishop Hebda to preach at prayer service for Reformation’s 500th anniversary

| January 20, 2017 | 67 Comments

Archbishop Bernard Hebda will represent the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis at an ecumenical prayer service Jan. 22 in recognition of the Reformation’s 500th anniversary.

He will preach for the Joint Evening Prayer in Commemoration of the Reformation at Central Lutheran Church in Minneapolis at 5 p.m. The archdiocese has partnered with the St. Paul Area Synod and the Minneapolis Area Synod for the service, which is open to the public. Bishop Patricia Lull of the St. Paul Area Synod and Bishop Ann Svennungsen of the Minneapolis Area Synod will also have prominent roles at the event.

Martin Luther, a German monk and key figure in the Protestant Reformation, is depicted in this painting at a church in Helsingor, Denmark.  CNS photo/Crosiers

The prayer service falls during the annual International Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, which runs Jan. 18-25.

The Reformation began in 1517 with Martin Luther’s “95 Theses,” a list of topics on which, the author believed, the Catholic Church needed to reform, and which he infamously nailed to a church door in Wittenberg, Germany. A Catholic priest himself, Martin Luther’s document and movement eventually led to his followers splitting from the Catholic Church. Other reformers followed suit during that period in history.

In the centuries following the Reformation, the Catholic Church has continued working with other churches to restore Christian Unity. Pope Francis has echoed that call in recent months.

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  • yeshuarose
  • yeshuarose

    CONDEMNING THE ERRORS OF MARTIN LUTHER

    Exsurge Domine

    Bull of Pope Leo X issued June 15, 1520

    http://www.papalencyclicals.net/Leo10/l10exdom.htm

  • samton909

    Go ahead, take communion. I dare not say more.

    • Dominic Deus
      • Jafin

        Extra ecclesiam nulla salus?

        • Dominic Deus

          Antolle ulua sulrim! 😉

          • Jafin

            HIja’

        • J. Boanerges

          Correct. Once someone is presented the Truth of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church and fail to enter, they are held accountable. Thought the conscience is “supreme” to your being, it is NOT supreme to the Way, the Truth and the Life.

    • Dominic Deus

      Please dare. All voices must be heard.

  • Parrish

    He is a heretic, like the Pope.

  • Tom A.

    Wake up Catholics!

  • Jafin

    I had such high hopes for our archbishop… sounds like he’s just gonna tow the party line… and on the same day as the March for Life, anniversary of the legalization of the whole sale slaughter of children. Great idea.

    • Dominic Deus

      Hope is not expectation young ones. It is the human virtue that allows us to stand at the end of knowledge, on the edge of the unknown, and see the possibilities. Honoring the courage of Father Martin and the hope of his Lutheran followers is, indeed, a great idea. Think of the possibilities!

      https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/49a648535baa31e2c726e6007f0761f0a59d6a169b09f16fe2da67a14116cc37.jpg

      • Jafin

        Posted above by yeshuarose:

        CONDEMNING THE ERRORS OF MARTIN LUTHER

        Exsurge Domine

        Bull of Pope Leo X issued June 15, 1520

        http://www.papalencyclicals.net/Leo10/l10exdom.htm

        If you’re Catholic, this is indeed binding and requires assent of intellect and will. A Papal Bull is the papal document with higher authority than any other, including our “beloved” Apostolic Exhortations.

        Martin Luther was condemned as a heretic and excommunicated. He died out of communion with the Church. He spoke vile words against the Pope, the Church, the Holy Mass, and even suggested Our Blessed Lord committed fornication at least 3 times. He violated his vow of celibacy and married a former nun (she also violated her vows.) He rejected the 7 sacraments established by Our Lord which the Church has decreed infallibly are necessary for salvation. And you say we should celebrate this man and his works of perdition? Nay, we must reject evil and cling to what is good.

        If you’re not Catholic, or simply a troll, then shoo. You’re making a fool of yourself.

        • Dominic Deus

          I have been accused of being a fool by some of the best fools in the business! Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses as a call to the same dialogue you reject. When dialogue was rejected, the left the Church to form (or “reform”) a different one. Obviously, he succeeded. But back to the 21st century–it is vital that you understand the meaning of the word you you chose: “hope.” What Martin Luther thought or did is of much less importance that what you think or so with your virtue of hope.

          • Jafin

            You’re deliberately being pedantic. You are aware of what the phrase “high hopes” means don’t you? Now… shoo.

          • Dominic Deus

            Of course I am. That’s what I do. That’s why the avatar. 😉

          • J. Boanerges

            Luther had numerous”dialogues” public and private. He willingly chose his path, followed his malformed conscience and formed his heretical Christian -lite, a faith that does not save. Only to see it fracture three more times before his death. So, it is apparent you’re sympathetic to Luther simply because you agree with him. Given your level of “education” it also appears your have made an educated decision to do so. If that’s the case Exsurge Domine applies to you as well.

          • Dominic Deus

            Yes, and a great deal of good came out of the conversation although the Hundred Years War was not it and the “good” took a long time to manifest itself. But it’s here now and as Archbishop Hebda exemplifies, we should join in ecumenical dialogue. Here is an interesting picture of the Martin Luther/Papal Interlocutors engaged in melodramatic debate. Looking back on it, don’t we all agree we can do better. to me, it looks like a bad opera. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b378f8c8866d0f3e7b9f16993a810929155e4ec53bf0fa5e7e5cc0a19707b022.jpg

          • J. Boanerges

            Wow! Were you there? Seems the Church (Deposit of Faith) doesn’t quite agree. The only thing good that came out of it was the Council of Trent formally codifying what we believe. and anathemetized that which we didn’t. Something the “parallel magisterium” of the “pastoral spirit of Vatican II” is trying to bury.

          • Dominic Deus

            Yes, I am the one at the far right in the back. I don’t usually occupy the far right but I arrived late. Always good to establish who the enemy is and anathematize them. As a matter of fact, I believe that has become a popular political strategy of late. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4225fc5468b660b9049eb175a104fbb6be9f74632f7326a872c22334a37b1998.jpg

          • J. Boanerges

            The political expediency of Luther’s “theology” fit in quite nicely with the secular prince’s avarice. Thus they did much to facilitate this “break with Rome”. Seems Mammon had more to do with it’s success (as we see clearly with Germany’s Marx and Kasper) than the lofty theological arguments the anathemetized former priest foisted.

          • Dominic Deus

            J.B.–It took me a while to figure out what you meant by “secular prince’s avarice”–for one brief moment, I thought you were referring to an Anne Rice novel.(She’s Catholic, you know.) I agree with you that the crowned heads of Europe were eager to get rid of the interference from Rome but Martin Luther was nothing if not politically clueless. He was entirely sincere and strictly theological in his purpose. Well, that and having lots of children. He apparently hung on to that part of being Catholic.

          • J. Boanerges

            Yes, he was politically clueless, which made him the perfect medium to manipulate for raking in the dough, as it were, from Rome. And, yes, he was sincere. He was also inconsistent, equivocal, undeveloped in his theology, schizoid and scrupulous. In short a megalomaniac head-case that was in desperate need of Prozac. Similar to Francis, he was the poster child for a revolution where division was celebrated. Unwittingly, he unleashed the seeds of dissent from the Church that gave us the Enlightenment, Freemasonry, the French Revolution and all sorts of secular aberrations that plague the world up to today.

          • J. Boanerges

            I see your avatar is the Angelic Doctor…awesome. It is my hope that is these discussions that we do NOT forget of Whom we speak. He is not an intellectual argument. He is Our Lord. In honor of My Lord and My God, I proffer this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3H5f7oePQE

  • RS

    I guess the roman calendar needs revising now also, because how can all who were martyred at the hands of Protestant heretics be considered saints now that Luthers revolt is being legitimized. The hierarchy has lost its mind!!!

    • Dominic Deus

      If you check the history on that, you will find that ,over the course of the Hundred Years War (including the Catholic Counter-reformation and the Thirty Years War) approximately one third of the German, largely Lutheran, population was killed or died as a result of religious war. But don’t worry–there is plenty of suffering, blood and guilt to go around so you can still blame Martin Luther as Long as you blame Leo X. Or you can live in the 21st century and try to do better than our ancestors did. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/49a648535baa31e2c726e6007f0761f0a59d6a169b09f16fe2da67a14116cc37.jpg

      • J. Boanerges

        Even considering the current papal status, it is repugnant to lay all this at the feet of the papacy (Leo X). Yes he did fail on many levels like Francis is failing on many levels. Yet didn’t we already have the Deposit of Faith? Weren’t the sacraments already ensconced at the essential mean of salvation? Did we not already have the Fathers and Doctors of the Church, whose theological treatises were so profound that they are beyond reproach? On Leo’s behalf, he was astute enough to send legates and the indomitable Fr. Johann Eck to test their (Luther and Melancthon’s) errors is public and soundly exposed them as frauds. Yet, here we are, regurgitating Luther’s demonic theology once again. Yes, Mr. Dominic Deus, the dog does return to his vomit.

        • Dominic Deus

          J.B. First, please accept my apology for my unfortunate lapse into the vernacular in using the colloquial “you” in some of my recent comments. I did not mean you personally or any of my other fellow commentarians. I have been so caught up in the stimulation of vigorous debate, I forgot my forms. I will be more observant going forward.

          Second, I express my appreciation for your obvious learning and scholarship. You cause me to think, even reconsider, and examine how I might argue against myself. I am a terrifying opponent, at least to myself.

          Third, I thank you for being a worthy adversary in forcing me to make my thoughts, prose, and reasoning more clear.

          Fourth, I admit to being an apologist for Archbishop Hebda and Pope Francis, though I, no doubt, have strong disagreements with them on some issues. So call me a heretic if you wish and I will embrace the (partial) correctness of your term. Call my Bernard or my Francis the same and the game is on! 😉 –Sherlock Holmes https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/68c3f66de6180ab370acd9631d352f8988f376be69b8942ba9f22c4732ffd3be.jpg

          • Dominic Deus

            J.B.–Which brings me to this: I need to better understand your fascination with the historical. Of course, the history of the Church is immense and I, too, find it fascinating but I do not consider it to be controlling my fate, my faith, my salvation (whatever that means) or even my relationship with God. It’s informative, it’s even instructional but it’s all prologue, no present and possibly predictive, just possibly, of the future at least insofar as the foolishness of mankind goes. Of course I am a product the Enlightenment, of arts and sciences, of liberal education as laid out by Francis Bacon. I am a humanist, a secularist, a rationalist, a scientist and yet I remain Catholic by choice. How so and why, do you think?

            Let me examine your post above.

            “…it is repugnant to lay all this at the feet of the papacy (Leo X). Yes he did fail on many levels like Francis is failing on many levels.”

            I agree. I think popes are as human as you or I. It is impossible for me to know the the full magnitude of what Leo X faced. A religion has to defend it’s orthodoxy. five hundred years later I say that does not include by force of arms or by coercing secular law. BUT..I say that with benefit of five hundred years of learning neither Leo nor Martin had. That was then; this is now

            “Yet didn’t we already have the Deposit of Faith?”

            Yes, with the Church but what if, after 1500 years, it was time for at least part of that deposit to move to the Faithful? Isn’t that what Protestant Reformation was about? The time of Christ was “then” and the sixteenth century was “now.”

            “Weren’t the sacraments already ensconced at the essential means of salvation?”

            Yes, but, except for Baptism, created by the Church. This is where your knowledge as a historian could help. I understand why Leo X was upset. Why was Martin Luther upset?

            “Did we not already have the Fathers and Doctors of the Church, whose theological treatises were so profound that they are beyond reproach?”

            No. they are just as human as the aforementioned popes. Profound, yes. Above reproach? Never. Balme it on the Enlightenment. My question to you is “Why do they seem above reproach?

            “On Leo’s behalf, he was astute enough to send legates and the indomitable Fr. Johann Eck to test their (Luther and Melancthon’s) errors in public and soundly exposed them as frauds.”

            Apparently the Germans didn’t think so. Here’s a portrayal of the, I think it could have been like really bad opera. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/b378f8c8866d0f3e7b9f16993a810929155e4ec53bf0fa5e7e5cc0a19707b022.jpg

            Yet, here we are, regurgitating Luther’s demonic theology once again. Yes, Mr. Dominic Deus, the dog does return to his vomit.

            Demonic seems a bit strong. How about “reformist theology”?

            On the matter of dogs I must stand my ground absent proof in scripture:

            “Cleaning up after themselves is one virtuous qualities of dogs–one that many humans lack. Further, dogs are excellent spiritual advisors and as Pope Francis has said, dogs do indeed go to Heaven. Of course he could be wrong but I hope not, since, if dogs aren’t worthy of eternal life, well, I know a lot of humans are really up a creek without a paddle.

            The right Reverend Brom Beamish https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/258404994e891f0a3b5b3447a12367d0cff1aba5adff652d5d27060f74c1685c.jpg

    • Dominic Deus

      I agree–sometimes the hierarchy loses its mind. Not on Ecumenism though. Some of my best friends are Lutheran and some of *them* used to be Catholics.

  • J. Boanerges

    You can’t “rehabilitate” this heretic. Here he stands…next to Arius…the destroyer of faith.

    • Dominic Deus

      Perhaps it is not he who needs rehabilitation.

      • J. Boanerges

        It is not an act of charity to facilitate “Communion” with those who subvert the faith. It has lethal consequences.

        • Dominic Deus

          Dire predictions Boanerges. Please elaborate.

          • J. Boanerges

            1 Corinthians 11:26-30

            Haydock Commentary:
            “This demonstrates the real presence of the body and blood of Christ, even to the unworthy communicant; who otherwise could not be guilty of the body and blood of Christ, or justly condemned for not discerning the Lord’s body. The real presence in the sacrament is also proved by the enormity of the crime, in its profanation. See St. Chrysostom, hom. de non contem. ec. and hom. lx. and lxi. ad pop. Antioch. where he shews that the unworthy receiver imitates the Jews in crucifying Jesus, and trampling under foot his sacred blood. Hence the dreadful punishments we read of in verses 27 and 30.”

            Cornelius ‘a Lapide Commentary:
            “Ver. 30.—For this cause many are weak. So at the present day, says S. Anselm, are many taken with various diseases after the Eucharist because they have received unworthily the Lord’s body.
            And many sleep. Die prematurely, and sleep in death, because they have communicated unworthily and without preparation. So S.Anselm and Chrysostom. They were even vexed by the devil because of this sin. Cf. S. Chrysostom (Hom. 5 in 1 Tim.). S. Cyprian (de Lapsis) gives examples. He says that some who had eaten things offered to idols, and then received the Eucharist, were struck dumb; another pulled out her tongue; a girl, after eating of idol-meats, vomited the elements. Francis Suarez piously warns us from this how careful a watch should be kept by every communicant over his tongue, because the tongue is the first member to receive Christ, and is the instrument by which He begins to be assimilated.”

          • J. Boanerges

            Question 80 part 5, Third Part, Summa Theologica, Reply to Objection 1. “The sin of the unworthy recipient is compared to the sin of them who slew Christ, by way of similitude, because each is committed against Christ’s body…”

            Also, those who conmunicate and are conscious of grave sin which includes refusal to amend ones life, or , fail to believe everything holy mother Church proposes for our belief (enter the Church) is a gravely sinful act. Such a sinful act can be construed as a sin against the Holy Spirit since it is through the Holy Spirit that the Blessed Sacrament draws its existence.

          • Dominic Deus

            Esteemed Boanerges–Thank you for these posts. I must read them and do some research and thinking in order to respond properly. I will get back to you but it may take me a few days. Thank you again for these important words.–Dominic Deus

          • Dominic Deus

            Boanerges: I am having great difficulty in locating your most recent post within the thread and fear it (the thread) has become overly complex. I will respond here.

            Thank you for the beautiful hymn. Like most Catholic kids I started singing Gregorian in second or third grade. The cello and feminine voices in this piece were a wonderful addition.

            Rest assured that my feelings about the true nature of Jesus and the mystical beauty of our Catholic faith are ever-present and you are right–this music reminds me of them. When I jest, it is never about the true nature of God and the beauty of Creation–my remarks are intended to question, explore the tension between faith and reason, search for the place wherein the mystical is honored by virtue of it’s own beauty, truth and light—-not the declarations of others. However, I understand that the declarations of the great Fathers of the Church have great, near infallible meaning to others and the fact is that I honor them too. I regard them as divinely inspired creations of the human mind and spirit–hence my admiration for the Eucharistic hymn which reads, near the close:

            “Down in adoration falling,
            This great Sacrament we hail,
            Over ancient forms of worship
            Newer rites of grace prevail;
            Faith will tell us Christ is present,
            When our human senses fail.”

            I believe in and can defend every word of that. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4225fc5468b660b9049eb175a104fbb6be9f74632f7326a872c22334a37b1998.jpg

          • J. Boanerges

            Then we are brothers. God’s blessings to you.

          • Dominic Deus

            And to you

  • Paula Ruddy

    I am grateful to Archbishop Hebda for his leadership in promoting Christian unity. “That they all may be one…” The Holy Spirit is working in the hearts of all people of faith. I pray that both Catholics and Lutherans can be open to the Spirit.

    • Jim K

      It’s remarkable how the religion that Jesus of Nazareth founded went so astray and ended up with its bloody history and division. People blame this on Paul of Tarsus and the New Testament, but I think it should be traced right back to the boss, that is, to Jesus himself. I’d be very much in favor of totally remodeling Christianity and have Pope Francis as the new savior, Holy Spirit incarnate, with a statue of him at the front of every church, instead of a cross or altar. What say you?

      • Paula Ruddy

        I wouldn’t go there, Jim. I think all of us, including Martin Luther and Pope Francis, were and are groping for the truth. Are you thinking that Jesus left us with mixed messages and that accounts for his followers being at each others’ throats? It could be that the integrating message is “God is love.” A message the human race has to grow into. We are farther along than we were 500 years ago but we still have a way to go. That is what Jesus’ cross means to me–a sign of the unloving that can be transformed. What happens at Mass each time. I agree with you that Francis is a good model of how to live the message. You too.

      • Tom A.

        The reason for all the disunity is simple. It goes back to satan and his refusal to serve. Likewise all the protestants. They refuse to serve Christ and demand their own version of God. Sadly the protestants have won the day and the Novus Ordo church has bought into the protestant lie and the cult of man. Reject everything prior to Vatican 2 and hold fast to tradition.

      • Parrish

        Francis agrees.

  • Derek Gilde

    I encourage that we keep an open mind to ecumenical practice and remember that all Christians are part of the universal church; all people are called to follow Christ as his disciples. We cannot underestimate the power to witnesses by such means; upholding truth and living ecumenically is possible. People like myself would have never found the Church if she were not open to rubbing shoulders with other Christians. I come from a strong confessional Lutheran background and the traditional doctrines of Luther were deeply engrained in my faith life. For me, knowing that the Catholic Church was ecumenical and friendly to non-Catholics helped me develop the courage to explore Catholic doctrines, engage in Catholic events, and ask questions as a non-Catholic. It led me to discover truth and leave my beloved faith traditions behind. It was incredibly difficult and intimidating to wrestle with matters of faith that I held so closely, I don’t think it would have been possible to get over the initial hump if it were not for the Church’s ecumenical and loving practices. Many are not aware that several protestant denominations are hungry for fellowship with the Church, when she extends her hand and upholds truth reform is possible. May the Church and we as followers of Jesus live as witnesses of hope for all people.

  • Djk2450

    What is the matter with these guys? Luther was a dirt-bag at least. I pray for our Church.

  • john654

    I will NEVER CELEBRATE the Protestant REVOLT!

    • Dominic Deus

      You have channeled the 16th century very well but its 2017. Seems to me you do not have to celebrate but you could tolerate. It’s sort of the American thing to do. It’s not like someone is forcing you to eat lutefisk; they are just offering you a slice of jülekogen. (Did I get that right?) I think it should occur to all of us that the Last Supper was probably served much like a smörgasbord.

      • john654

        Yea, But, But, there are some things I DON’T tolerate!

      • john654

        “I think it should occur to all of us that the Last Supper was probably served much like a smörgasbord”. Your so wrong it’s not funny. It’s really not. How could you make a statement like that?

        • Dominic Deus

          https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/137162b198d168e6ebf7b2608215b61046bb27ffb2e60c07f8679e2a109bc95b.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/6ba44fc989345b1b9746fc5a982efd8dc6a221e902d523dba2f42ca034892831.jpg https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/959207c970840f4de9eca557eb71498cb15efc067609441b5c999543d0c8e9c9.jpg John654–It’s just a metaphor. Explanation: There is more than one way to approach the supper table. A Passover Seder is not the only approved method. If you are a Scandinavian Lutheran, you might have a smörgasbord. If you are a Minnesota Methodist, you might have tater tot hot dish and lime Jello. What do you do at your house? The point is that whenever two or more of us are gathered in the name of Jesus, we can experience the real flesh and blood presence of, the humanity of, our brother Jesus the carpenter from Nazareth. Personally, I don’t think of lime Jello or tater tot hot dish as being biblical but maybe for some people, kids maybe, the warm and wonderful feeling that they get from that plus grandma’s pumpkin pie is the most wonderful feeling of love, family and belonging there is. I guarantee you that there are trans-generational Jello moulds and family hot dish recipes that transcend even death. I am always shocked when people seem to compare the Last Supper to some kind of farewell banquet or corporate awards dinner. It was a *family* dinner and the family includes Lutherans and all other Protestants. Whatever your beef is with Martin Luther, take it up with him, but ask yourself, “How much time do I want to spend criticizing a man who has been dead for almost 500 years?” Talk to your fellow Christians. A lot of good came out of the Reformation and one example is that our wise and loving Archbishop Hebda can celebrate an ecumenical service with them–and you are invited.

          • john654

            With all due respect and in humility, SHUT UP!

          • Dominic Deus

            Brother John,
            The conversation always continues. The only thing we get to decide is whether or not to participate.??????????????????

    • J. Boanerges

      Like celebrating a divorce. Fr. Johann Eck, whose disputation in 1519 exposed Luther and Melanchthon’s true intention of separating with the Barque of Peter. So much so that the Duke of Saxoy expelled him. Despite several efforts of the Church to get Luther to retract his assertions on his novelties, he waffled and equivocated. But ultimately his pride prevented him from recanting. We “sacramentarians”, as he pejoratively called Catholics, were scum of the earth in his eyes.

  • Paula Ruddy

    The prayer service was inspiring. We are together, Catholics and Lutherans, baptized into the life of Christ. We are not defined by the divisions of the past but by our baptism. Catholics and Lutherans have made 5 commitments published in the document “From Conflict to Communion.” Here is No. 5: Catholics and Lutherans should witness together to the mercy of God in proclamation and service to the world.

    Maybe the Catholic Spirit would tell us about the document and how it came to be.

  • tallorder

    Blatant heresy. Who is surprised anymore? There are obviously two “churches” here. One being led by the nose into schism by the man in the seat of Peter, and one underground clinging to the ‘rigid’ tradition of the fathers.