From log cabin to national shrine

| February 26, 2015 | 0 Comments

The Cathedral of St. Paul that draws thousands of visitors each year from across the country and beyond actually is the fourth cathedral structure in the Archdiocese of
St. Paul and Minneapolis.

A log cabin built in 1841 served as the first cathedral in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. It was called the Chapel of St. Paul

A log cabin built in 1841 served as the first cathedral in the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis. It was called the Chapel of St. Paul

The first was a log cabin built in October, 1841, and was called the Chapel of St. Paul. It was located near what is now Kellogg Boulevard, between the Robert and Wabasha Street bridges. The City of St. Paul derives its name from the Chapel of St. Paul.

This log cabin became the first cathedral in 1851 with the arrival of Bishop Joseph Cretin as the first Bishop of St. Paul.

Second cathedral at Sixth and Wabasha Streets in downtown St. Paul

Second cathedral at Sixth and Wabasha Streets in downtown St. Paul

The second cathedral was built on the corner of 6th and Wabasha Streets in downtown St. Paul. It cost just $5,900 to build, and was considered too small from the beginning, hence the need for a third — and bigger — cathedral.

Third cathedral built in 1858 and located located at corner of Sixth and St. Peter Streets

Third cathedral built in 1858 and located located at corner of Sixth and St. Peter Streets

No. 3 was constructed in 1858 and located on the corner of Sixth and St. Peter Streets. This building was significantly larger, able to hold 1,000 people. The first Mass in this building was celebrated in 1858, and was the site where Father (later Archbishop) John Ireland was ordained a priest in 1861. He became the cathedral rector in 1867.

It was also in this building that Father Ireland was consecrated the third bishop of St. Paul in 1884 and the first archbishop in 1888. The last Mass celebrated in this church was by Archbishop Ireland Aug. 30, 1914. Archbishop Ireland later oversaw the building of the current cathedral and celebrated the first Mass there March 28, 1915.

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Category: Cathedral Centennial