Pope recognizes martyrdom of Oklahoma priest killed in Guatemala

| December 2, 2016 | 0 Comments
Pope Francis has recognized the martyrdom of Father Stanley Rother of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City, making him the first martyr born in the United States. Father Rother is pictured in an undated file photo. CNS photo/Charlene Scott

Pope Francis has recognized the martyrdom of Father Stanley Rother of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City, making him the first martyr born in the United States. Father Rother is pictured in an undated file photo. CNS photo/Charlene Scott

Pope Francis has recognized the martyrdom of Father Stanley Rother of the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City, making him the first martyr born in the United States.

The Vatican made the announcement Dec. 2. The recognition of his martyrdom clears the way for his beatification.

Father Rother, born March 27, 1935, on his family’s farm near Okarche, Oklahoma, was brutally murdered July 28, 1981, in a Guatemalan village where he ministered to the poor.

He was a close friend of Archbishop Harry Flynn, retired archbishop of St. Paul and Minneapolis. The two met while studying at Mount St. Mary’s Seminary in Emmitsburg, Maryland, and Archbishop Flynn has written and preached about him over the years.

Archbishop Flynn said, “we became very, very good friends. I was once asked what I remember about him in seminary, and I answered that I envied the way he prayed, when he could come from recreation and go into the chapel and immediately seem to be centered in prayer.”

Father Rother went to Santiago Atitlan in 1968 on assignment from the Archdiocese of Oklahoma City. He helped the people there build a small hospital, school and its first Catholic radio station. He was beloved by the locals, who called him “Padre Francisco.”

Many priests and religious in Guatemala became targets during the country’s 1960-1996 civil war as government forces cracked down on leftist rebels supported by the rural poor.

The bodies of some of Father Rother’s deacons and parishioners were left in front of his church and soon he received numerous death threats over his opposition to the presence of the Guatemalan military in the area.

Though he returned to Oklahoma for a brief period, he returned to the Guatemalan village to remain with the people he had grown to love during the more than dozen years he lived there.

He was gunned down at the age 46 in the rectory of his church in Santiago Atitlan. Government officials there put the blame on the Catholic Church for the unrest in the country that they said led to his death. On the day he died, troops also killed 13 townspeople and wounded 24 others in Santiago Atitlan, an isolated village 50 miles west of Guatemala City.

Many priests and religious lost their lives and thousands of civilians were kidnapped and killed during the years of state-sponsored oppression in the country.

While his body was returned to Oklahoma, his family gave permission for his heart and some of his blood to be enshrined in the church of the people he loved and served. A memorial plaque marks the place.

“I went down there [Guatemala] and brought the heart to its final resting place in the church,” Archbishop Flynn said.

Father Rother was considered a martyr by the church in Guatemala and his name was included on a list of 78 martyrs for the faith killed during Guatemala’s 36-year-long civil war. The list of names to be considered for canonization was submitted by Guatemala’s bishops to St. John Paul II during a pastoral visit to Guatemala in 1996.

In a 1999 column for The Catholic Spirit, Archbishop Flynn described visiting the room in Santiago where Father Rother was murdered. The priest’s blood was still on the wall, and the bullet hole still in the floor.

“I tried to image the terror that must have been his in the day before his murder and in those moments the assailants entered his room,” he wrote. “He moved from bedroom to bedroom within the rectory so that his assailants would not have a clear idea of where he was sleeping. However, on the fateful night, they did gain entrance to the mission compound and demanded from the  maintenance man that he take them to Father Stanley’s room. He simply called out and said: ‘Father, they are looking for you.’ Father Stan opened the door, but did not want to be taken from the house and killed. He wanted to be killed in his own house.”

Archbishop Flynn had spent a week with Father Rother in 1979 at Mount St. Mary, and recalled the priest’s description of terrible things happening to the Guatemalan people. “After that week of prayer and discernment he seemed to have known what he had to do,” he wrote. “He had to return as he himself said: ‘The shepherd cannot desert the sheep when the sheep are in danger.'”

Because Father Rother was killed in Guatemala, his cause should have been undertaken there. But the local church lacked the resources for such an effort. The Guatemalan bishops’ conference agreed to a transfer of jurisdiction to the Oklahoma City archdiocese.

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