Classical MPR, KARE win Gabriel Awards for ‘values-centered programming’

| June 23, 2017 | 2 Comments

Minnesota Public Radio and KARE 11 were recognized June 22 at the 2017 Gabriel Awards, hosted by the Catholic Academy of Communication Professionals.

St. Paul-based MPR was recognized for its locally-released documentary “Kaddish: Reflections on the Holocaust in Music and Words” and single Facebook post “Bridge of Song” in the radio documentary and new media categories, respectively. Minneapolis-based KARE 11 earned an award in the news and informational television, local release, category for its series “Land of 10,000 Stories.”

According to the Catholic Academy, the Gabriel Awards “honor works of excellence in film, network, cable television and radio as well as our newly created categories in social media” and “recognize outstanding artistic achievement in media that entertains and enriches with a true vision of humanity and a true vision of life.”

“Kaddish: Reflections on the Holocaust in Music and Words” is a collection of conversations Classical MPR host Mindy Ratner had with people who had been affected directly by the Holocaust. The hour-long program also includes musical compositions related to the Holocaust. It aired May 4, 2016, to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day.

“Bridge of Song” was a concert with inspirational readings held at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis July 14, 2016, and organized by Classical Minnesota Public Radio in response to violence in the Twin Cities. MPR livestreamed the hour-plus event on Facebook.

KARE 11 reporter Boyd Huppert’s weekly TV segment “Land of 10,000 Stories” shares the stories of unique and inspirational people and places in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

According to the ACA, “the prestigious Gabriel Awards are an important component of the Catholic Academy of Communication Professionals’mission to proclaim the good news. Entrants go through a highly selective process of preliminary screening and blue-ribbon judging, which includes judging in values, content, creativity, artistic quality, technical quality and impact. By maintaining these high standards, the Academy is able to reward media professionals for outstanding work that might otherwise not be recognized for its enrichment value.”

It calls its award, a silver angel, “a salute to all those who strive for values-centered programming.”  This year’s awards banquet was held in Quebec, Canada.

Category: Local News

  • Matt Wagner

    I used to love listening to Classical MPR until just a few months ago when they started running advertisements for Planned Parenthood. Very disappointing. I no longer listen to them.

    • Charles C.

      From the National Public Radio website we learn that 14% of their revenues come from government.

      There seems to be a difference between “Revenues” and “Operating Budget”, as they say:

      “On average, less than 1% of NPR’s annual operating budget comes in the
      form of grants from CPB and federal agencies and departments.”

      But, if that is true, one wonders what to make of the claim in the adjacent paragraph of their report that:

      “Elimination of federal funding would result in fewer programs, less journalism—especially local journalism—and eventually the loss of public radio stations, particularly in rural and economically distressed communities.”

      I can find classical music elsewhere.