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Why you should read C.S. Lewis’ ‘The Great Divorce’

Why you should read C.S. Lewis’ ‘The Great Divorce’

| Bishop Robert Barron | September 21, 2016 | 1 Comment

In my capacity as regional bishop of the Santa Barbara pastoral region, which covers two entire counties north of Los Angeles, I am obliged to spend a good deal of time in the car. To make the trips easier, I have gotten back into the habit of listening to audio books. Just recently, I followed, with rapt attention, a book that I had read many years ago but which I had, I confess, largely forgotten: C.S. Lewis’ “The Great Divorce.”

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3 Reasons Why ‘Vikings’ is the Most Religiously Interesting Show on TV

3 Reasons Why ‘Vikings’ is the Most Religiously Interesting Show on TV

| Bishop Robert Barron | July 26, 2016 | 1 Comment

At the prompting of some of my younger colleagues at Word on Fire, I spent time during a recent vacation getting caught up on the History Channel show Vikings. My friends had told me that Vikings, curiously, is the most religious show on television. They were right.

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Thomas Aquinas and the art of making a public argument

Thomas Aquinas and the art of making a public argument

| Bishop Robert Barron | July 7, 2016 | 2 Comments

There is, in many quarters, increasing concern about the hyper-charged political correctness that has gripped our campuses and other forums of public conversation. Even great works of literature and philosophy — from “Huckleberry Finn” and “Heart of Darkness” to, believe it or not, Kant’s “Critique of Pure Reason” — are now regularly accompanied by “trigger warnings” that alert prospective readers to the racism, sexism, homophobia or classism contained therein.

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Bill Nye is not the Philosophy Guy

Bill Nye is not the Philosophy Guy

| Bishop Robert Barron | April 6, 2016 | 0 Comments

Reliable sources have informed me that for the millennial generation Bill Nye is a figure of great importance, due to his widely-watched program from the 1990’s called “Bill Nye the Science Guy.” Evidently, he taught a large swath of American youth the fundamentals of experimental science and became for them a sort of paragon of reason. Well, I’ll take their word for it.

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‘The Revenant’ and the search for a higher justice

‘The Revenant’ and the search for a higher justice

| Bishop Robert Barron | February 2, 2016 | 0 Comments

Alejandro Iñárritu’s new film “The Revenant” is one of the most talked about movies, and for good reason. The opening 20 minutes, which feature a frighteningly realistic Indian attack and a horrifically vivid mauling by a grizzly bear, are absolutely compelling viewing. And the remainder of the film is so involving that this viewer, at least, felt physically sick as he followed the sufferings of the main character.

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Daniel and the great unveiling

Daniel and the great unveiling

| Bishop Robert Barron | November 18, 2015 | 0 Comments

Toward the end of the liturgical year, we Catholics hear at Mass from the mysterious, often confounding and utterly fascinating book of Daniel. Recent scholarship has demonstrated that the book of Daniel had an extraordinarily powerful influence on the first Christians, providing them a most important template for understanding the significance of Jesus. Daniel is, of course, an example of apocalyptic literature, which in the common understanding means that it has to do with the end of the world.

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Pope’s message on mercy not indifference to sin

Pope’s message on mercy not indifference to sin

| Bishop Robert Barron | October 21, 2015 | 0 Comments

Having just returned from a week covering Pope Francis’ triumphant journey to the United States, I can confidently tell you that the news media are in love with the Vicar of Christ.

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Our lives don’t belong to us

Our lives don’t belong to us

| Bishop Robert Barron | September 24, 2015 | 2 Comments

It was [recently] revealed that, for the first time in its history, Harvard University, which had been founded for religious purposes and named for a minister of the Gospel, has admitted a freshman class in which atheists and agnostics outnumber professed Christians and Jews. Also . . . the House and the Senate of California passed a provision that allows for physician assisted suicide in the Golden State. As I write these words, the governor of California is deliberating whether to sign the bill into law. Though it might seem strange to suggest as much, I believe that the make-up of the Harvard freshman class and the passing of the suicide law are really related.

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Mother Nature is one unreliable lady, so look higher

Mother Nature is one unreliable lady, so look higher

| Bishop Robert Barron | September 10, 2015 | 0 Comments

Conservation International has sponsored a series of videos that have become YouTube sensations, garnering millions of views. They feature famous actors — Harrison Ford, Kevin Spacey, Robert Redford and others — voicing different aspects of the natural world, from the ocean, to the rain forest, to redwood trees. The most striking is the one that presents Mother Nature herself, given voice by Julia Roberts.

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A message in blood: ISIS and the meaning of the cross

A message in blood: ISIS and the meaning of the cross

| Father Robert Barron | March 12, 2015 | 0 Comments

Just before their throats were cut, many of the murdered Coptic Christians could be seen mouthing the words “Jesus Christ” and “Jesus is Lord.” The first of those phrases is a rendering of the Aramaic Ieshouah Maschiach, which means “Jesus the anointed one” and which hearkens back to King David, the paradigmatic anointed figure of the Old Testament.

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If you want to be a good person, it matters what you believe

If you want to be a good person, it matters what you believe

| Father Robert Barron | December 17, 2014 | 1 Comment

A team of sociologists, led by Catholic University professor William D’Antonio, published a survey a few years ago that received quite a bit of media attention, for it showed that many Catholics disagree with core doctrines of their Church and yet still consider themselves “good Catholics.”

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Having Patience for the Sausage-Making Synod

Having Patience for the Sausage-Making Synod

| Father Robert Barron | October 20, 2014 | 0 Comments

The midterm report on the deliberations of the Synod on the Family has appeared and there is a fair amount of hysteria all around. John Thavis, a veteran Vatican reporter who should know better, has declared this statement “an earthquake, the big one that hit after months of smaller tremors.” Certain commentators on the right have been wringing their hands and bewailing a deep betrayal of the Church’s teaching. One even opined that this report is the “silliest document ever issued by the Catholic Church,” and some have said that the interim document flaunts the teaching of St. John Paul II. Meanwhile the New York Times confidently announced that the Church has moved from “condemnation of unconventional family situations and toward understanding, openness, and mercy.” I think everyone should take a deep breath.

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